Life On Marsland

Life On Marsland

Hello all

There is a lot to report at the moment – The Spicks and Specktacular hits the road again tomorrow for two weeks, A Very Specky Christmas TV special has been filmed, was great, and airs on Sunday Dec 21, and my DVD is still in stores.

However, all of these things take a back seat this week to the tragic death of a friend of mine by the name of Richard Marsland. You may have heard him on radio co-hosting Triple M Breakfast with Pete and Myf, or working alongside Tony Martin on GET THIS, or even from the good old days at SAFM Adelaide.

Richard was undoubtedly one of the nicest, most talented and well-repected people I have ever met. From the days of listening to him on the overnight shift at SAFM, to working with him in the studio, to meeting up with him again in Melbourne, I was always really happy to see him, and enjoyed listening to what he had to say on air and off. He had a true comedy mind, and I was always a little in awe of what he produced.

The only drawback to Richard’s personality was that he seemed to find it hard to believe the great things people had to say about him. I wonder if he knew, really knew, how loved he was.

This brings me to a point. It is important for people, especially men, to let someone know when they are having a tough time in life. As someone put it to me the other night “Guys need to know it’s ok to say to a friend ‘Mate, I’m in a bit of trouble here’ ”

I replied that those words should be the basis of a marketing campaign for Beyond Blue, or Lifeline, or any number of crisis centres. Maybe we shouldn’t even call them crisis centres, or support lines. Maybe if we called them “Repair Centres”, or “Workshops” or even “Sheds” more blokes would visit them. Anywhere they could say to a mate “I’m in a bit of trouble here”

I will miss Richard, and do already, and took great pleasure listening to his sketches on Triple M this morning. I’ll always wish we had caught up for that beer, that we had sat down and talked about comedy til the cows came home, and that I could tell him again and again how much his comedy made me laugh. Most of all, I wish I could have heard what he would have done next. Cos I know it would have been great.

My thought are with his family, but also with all the friends of Richard, a lot of whom are my friends as well, that loved him and are devastated that he left us.

The only thing we can do is learn from his time here – and for the moment the lesson is this: if you’re in trouble, tell someone. Preferably a professional. Don’t be afraid to tell a friend how you feel, or even better, tell someone who knows how to deal with it and does so on a daily basis. Don’t let things go unsaid, because sometimes you just never know how much people really love you, even if you don’t see it.

That’s all for now, I hope my next blog comes from happier circumstances.

“Gentle shoulder charge, love you mate”

Adam

6 Comments

  • Barb

    10.12.2008 at 10:22 Reply

    Thank you.

  • Gary

    10.12.2008 at 10:29 Reply

    That was a really great way of putting it Adam, and I’m sure encapsulates how a lot of people are feeling right now. I was lucky enough to have met Richard, but unlucky that I didn’t know him better, and the first thing that struck me was just how simply friendly he was, and as it was at a social event, how clearly loved he was. Unfortunately though, he mustn’t have really convinced himself that he was genuinely admired by a great many people.

    Your marketing ideas for dealing with depression are great, you should seriously consider running with it, or at the very least sell your ideas to someone else for some exorbitant fee. Again, thanks for your words, I’m sure they’ll mean a lot to many who’ll read them.

    I look forward to sitting down to A Very Specky Christmas, it’s quickly becoming a yearly tradition in our household.

  • Dave

    10.12.2008 at 10:39 Reply

    Good stuff Adam. An idea’s been floated on a fan site that Beyond Blue or similar agency could run a fundraiser based on the Get This ‘Capril’ concept – a competition the lads once held where people sent in photos of themselves doing everyday things while wearing capes. I don’t know how it would go with copyright issues etc, but it sounds like a good way to support a good cause and remember a brilliant radio (and comedy in general) talent at the same time.

  • Simon

    10.12.2008 at 11:07 Reply

    Nice words, Adam.

    I had the great pleasure of meeting Richard last year at the after show party for Get This at The Dick Withington Pub. I think we talked for 10 minutes or so about radio and comedy. Richard was indeed a top bloke and its a real tragedy that we couldn’t have known what was going the poor guys head so we could have tried to help him.

    What’s that Billy Joel song – ‘Only the god die young’

  • Kim

    10.12.2008 at 18:18 Reply

    Thanks for making this post, Adam. Your message is really important, and I hope anyone who is feeling isolated, stressed and upset – males in particular – take note.

  • beth

    15.12.2008 at 05:31 Reply

    thank you

    brilliant way of putting those words, and i hope that anyone with a problem or is feeling depressed wil tell someone and get it out in the open.

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